The trinity of product design


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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Yesterday, I watched as a friend of mine created an Expensify account for his startup. He was trying the product for the first time. I took notes without saying much. The experience reminded me of the hours I spent in Google’s usability labs watching people use our AdSense Demographic Targeting beta product. In those sessions, I remember feeling a sense of excitement followed by frustration - even disillusionment. Often, the product confused users.

The trinity of product design


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Yesterday, I watched as a friend of mine created an Expensify account for his startup. He was trying the product for the first time. I took notes without saying much. The experience reminded me of the hours I spent in Google’s usability labs watching people use our AdSense Demographic Targeting beta product. In those sessions, I remember feeling a sense of excitement followed by frustration - even disillusionment. Often, the product confused users. And I had only one person to blame: myself.

The Three Customer Types

It was challenging to meet the needs of three user segments in our user base: new users, occasional users and power users. New users need to be educated to use the product in their first visit, in a straightforward way, without being educated. Instead, it should feel like an invitation - an enticement. Occasional users may return to the product infrequently. They remember certain Continue reading "The trinity of product design"

The culture of data science


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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In a triumph of statistics, Nate Silver predicted the outcome of every state in the Presidential election correctly. What makes this story so noteworthy isn’t that it proves data enables superior decision-making to human intuition. We know the math works. Instead, Silver’s success highlights and challenges the prevailing culture, present in politics and in the workplace, that overvalues intuition and undervalues data. Our analysis tools and our access to big data are forcing cultural change at the broadest scale.

The culture of data science


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In a triumph of statistics, Nate Silver predicted the outcome of every state in the Presidential election correctly. What makes this story so noteworthy isn’t that it proves data enables superior decision-making to human intuition. We know the math works. Instead, Silver’s success highlights and challenges the prevailing culture, present in politics and in the workplace, that overvalues intuition and undervalues data. Our analysis tools and our access to big data are forcing cultural change at the broadest scale. The latest field to face this upheaval is journalism. It won’t be the last. Data is the most cogent argument. Because we compare Silver’s predictions to the outcome, we can understand his thought process and his logic. It’s black and white. Right or wrong. And if it’s wrong, we can fix the models. Political parties, journalists, and startups that build cultures that use data to make dispassionate arguments and objectively measure Continue reading "The culture of data science"

Radio Ga Ga


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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Must content platforms be reinvented every few years? Left to its own devices, the mob will augment, accessorize, spam, degrade and noisify whatever they have access to, until it loses beauty and function and becomes something else. Seth Godin Given the noise and misinformation disseminated on Twitter both during the election and the Sandy disaster, I’ve been wondering how Godin’s thoughts apply to new information networks: blogs and feeds.

Radio Ga Ga


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Must content platforms be reinvented every few years?
Left to its own devices, the mob will augment, accessorize, spam, degrade and noisify whatever they have access to, until it loses beauty and function and becomes something else.
Seth Godin
Given the noise and misinformation disseminated on Twitter both during the election and the Sandy disaster, I’ve been wondering how Godin’s thoughts apply to new information networks: blogs and feeds.

Sifting the feed in search of the truth

There is an undeniable early movement toward editorially curated publishing. The Twitter founders have launched the most visible response. Medium, a low volume, high quality content site is a direct (and opposite) reaction to the high volume, noisy Twitter feed.

Content proliferation is governed by its half-life

In addition to volume reduction, Medium axes another dimension: time. Medium places no dates on its posts. Instead, Medium uses a voting system to
dolmen_fm_radio.jpg
Continue reading "Radio Ga Ga"

The idea factory


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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This morning, I listened to an interview of Jon Gertner who has published a chronicle of Bell Labs called the Idea Factory. In his book and the interview, Gertner highlighted points about the Bell Labs that relate to Clay Christensen’s recent New York Times editorial, the Capitalist’s Dilemma. Bell Labs was a house of magic - a place of prodigious invention and innovation. In a single year, Bell scientists and engineers developed the transistor, satellite communication and information theory (the theory that underpins all digital technologies).

The idea factory


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This morning, I listened to an interview of Jon Gertner who has published a chronicle of Bell Labs called the Idea Factory. In his book and the interview, Gertner highlighted points about the Bell Labs that relate to Clay Christensen’s recent New York Times editorial, the Capitalist’s Dilemma. Bell Labs was a house of magic - a place of prodigious invention and innovation. In a single year, Bell scientists and engineers developed the transistor, satellite communication and information theory (the theory that underpins all digital technologies). The advances pioneered by Bell have created 100 years of massive economic growth: the Internet, digital communication, semiconductors for the US. In the Capitalist’s Dilemma, Christensen divides innovations into three types: empowering innovations (the transistor, the engine, fiberoptics) which create new markets, industries and jobs; sustaining innovations (hybrid cars, electric toothbrushes) which replace existing products with marginally better ones; and efficiency innovations (minimills and
Continue reading "The idea factory"

Mobile OS trends in five charts


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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In May 2010, I bet a good friend of mine that Android would overtake iOS in total devices shipments in 12 months' time. My prediction was completely off the mark. In May 2011, iOS led cumulative shipments by more than 100%: 191M to 95M. It would take another 10 months for Android to equal Apple in March 2011 at about 325M each. Race to one billion devices But Android reached this milestone in a way I didn’t anticipate.