5 Free and Discounted SaaS Tools to Get You Through Coronavirus


This post is by Team SaaStr from SaaStr


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If you’re feeling the weight of being cloistered in your homes for several weeks now, have no fear Team SaaStr has compiled a list of five great tools that you can use for free to get you through this time! We’ll be releasing several upcoming posts featuring great tools and discounts that our community members are offering right now.

1. SurveyMonkey’s Free Templates

Where can I find the deal? Click here for SurveyMonkey’s List of Resources What are they all about? SurveyMonkey is a global leader in survey software. 20 million questions answered daily.

2. Hugo is Now Free Up to 40 Users

Where can I find the deal? Click here for Hugos’ Connected Meeting Notes – Up to 40 Users free so that everyone can stay in sync during this time. What are they all about? Hugo is Connected Meeting Notes software that powers your team with centralized, searchable
Continue reading "5 Free and Discounted SaaS Tools to Get You Through Coronavirus"

If You Have to Cut — 5 Thoughts On Where


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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Q: Based on what is going on in the world right now (coronavirus), is this the right time to ask businesses to outsource? Should I keep my cold calling team? What will be the best marketing strategy?

There are no easy answers, but we do know one thing:

When things come back, you will need everyone great.

Marc Benioff said one of his top mistakes was not hiring enough salespeople in 2009, during the peak of the last downturn.

  • At almost every company, if we’re honest, the “bottom” 10% doesn’t contribute that much if any value. If you have to cut, start there. Every VP, every manager, and probably even most employees know who isn’t contributing enough. It’s about a 20-minute discussion to align on who the bottom 10% is. Beyond that is harder.
  • And then, if you have to cut more, at least think about if you can repurpose Continue reading "If You Have to Cut — 5 Thoughts On Where"

As a CEO of a Startup, Is It Normal to Argue With Your Co-founder Early On?


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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Q: As a CEO of a Startup, Is It Normal to Argue With Your Co-founder Early On?

It is common. It is not IME normal.

I’ve had 2 incredible co-founder experiences. And I’ve had 1.5 challenging ones. (I’m broadly defining things).

Some folks do like to argue. I don’t. Some folks do like to be challenged. I do.

But being a co-founder has to be a 1+1=4 relationship. When you’ve had that, you know. When you have it, you should know.

If it feels like 1+1=1.8, or less … then it’s broken I think. It’s probably not fixeable.

But it might be. Try. Bring in an outsider to see if you can improve communication and fix it. Sometimes, it’s not too late.

But sit the both of your down and ask is 1+1=4? If you can’t agree it is, something is off.

More here: A Simple Commitment Test Continue reading "As a CEO of a Startup, Is It Normal to Argue With Your Co-founder Early On?"

Great Salespeople Are Made, Not Born. But It Does Help to Start Early.


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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Q: Are great salespeople born or made?

I think they are made in SaaS — but made early.

By that, I mean the best SaaS professionals and managers I know have a variety of approaches and temperaments. Some have a very intellectual approach to sales. Some shoot a lot from the hip. Some are aggressive, others are determined (similar, but different).

But all the best ones I know started early. Often, their first job or close to it. As an SDR. As a recruiter. Maybe even outside of technology. But they started there, learning, improving, and growing.

What I do worry about is someone that later in their career that wants to get into sales because they think it pays better, or is more glamorous. I don’t see that work out that often.

Getting 50 No’s before a Yes is tough. Probably best to learn early if that’s you.

The Continue reading "Great Salespeople Are Made, Not Born. But It Does Help to Start Early."

When a VC Investment Fails, Does That Mean It Was a Bad Investment? Probably Not


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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With venture capital investments that fail, is the problem most often with the entrepreneur or was it a bad investment by the VC?

There often is no problem.

The earlier stage you invest, the more often some of them just … don’t work out.

Bill Gurley’s answer to How much money did Benchmark capital lose on Webvan?

The above answer on Quora from Bill Gurley sort of sums it all up. He and they are some of the most successful investors of all time.

But some just don’t work out, even with the best CEOs and founders. Especially when you invest early.

Every VC investor has a model for loss ratios. Both in terms of how many start-ups in their portfolio are modelled to fail, and what % of the capital in that fund is modelled to go into losses. It’s often around 40%/20%. I.e., 40% of the Continue reading "When a VC Investment Fails, Does That Mean It Was a Bad Investment? Probably Not"

What To Do When A Customer Wants to Cancel A Contract


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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In today’s crazy world, more and more vendors are seeing customers that want to cancel annual or longer contracts. What should you do? The simple answer “of course” in that yearly contracts can’t be canceled — per se. That’s the whole point of whatever explicit or implicit discount you give for doing a yearly contract (vs. monthly or quarterly). And the language likely will plainly say the contract cannot be canceled. But … it’s just a contract. So a few qualifiers:
  • If you haven’t received pre-paid cash, it doesn’t matter. Do NOT threaten to send the customer into collections – period. Especially now, these days. There is no effective way to enforce a customer contract if the customer doesn’t want to pay and doesn’t need the service any longer. Do not create drama. This won’t work, and it will turn someone who just might be a customer again into someone Continue reading "What To Do When A Customer Wants to Cancel A Contract"

The Playbook to Running Growth Experiments at Scale with Growth Ex Machina Founder Guillaume Cabane (Video + Transcript)


This post is by Louise Lee from SaaStr


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Founder Guillaume Cabane provides information on when and how to run a growth team and provides multiple examples of growth models. Use these tools to determine how to run growth experiments at your organization. Want to see more content like this? Join us at SaaStr Annual 2020.   Guillaume Cabane | Founder @ Growth Ex Machina FULL TRANSCRIPT BELOW I’m Guillaume Cabane and today I’m going to talk about The Playbook To Running Growth Experiments At Scale. The first thing that I want to put out immediately for growth people and for founders is that I want to trash out all the KPIs and we’re going to focus just on revenue. That seems obvious because, see most companies don’t do that. But before I go into the dough here, who am I, what have I done, very quickly, I worked at a few of those recognizable companies, most notably lately
Continue reading "The Playbook to Running Growth Experiments at Scale with Growth Ex Machina Founder Guillaume Cabane (Video + Transcript)"

How do you build strong relationships with customers?


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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Q: How do you build strong relationships with customers?

A few simple ideas:

7 Signs an Angel Investor … May Really Be a “Devil” Investor


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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What are some signs that an “angel investor” is really a “devil investor”?

Some top signs trouble may come later from an “angel” investor:

  • The terms are way, way, way too complicated. To me, this is flag #01 by far. Angel investing should be simple. What matters is price, check size, and maybe, pro rata rights in the next round (if you have a significant amount of capital to invest later). Nothing else really matters. Complex, multi-page term sheets for an angel investment are signs of problems to come.
  • Too much focus on control. Money should have checks-and-balances. No one should have to worry that founders will misuse funds. But investors shouldn’t be worried about controlling board of directors, or rights to pick the CEO, etc. in an angel round. If you are selling > 20% of your company, granting a board seat to the investors is fair. But even Continue reading "7 Signs an Angel Investor … May Really Be a “Devil” Investor"