SaaStr Podcast #135: Auren Hoffman, Founder & CEO @ Safegraph on Why Raising Prices Is Not A Good Idea


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Welcome to Episode 135! Auren Hoffman is the Founder & CEO of Safegraph, the startup that is unlocking the world’s most powerful data so that machines and humans can answer society’s toughest questions. They have backing from likes of Naval Ravikant and prior guests of the show including SignalFire, IDG Ventures, and David Rodnitzky, just to name a few. Prior to Safegraph, Auren has an astonishing 5 successful exits under his belt with one being, LiveRamp (sold to Acxiom for $310m in 2014). If that was not enough, Auren is also a prolific angel investor with a portfolio including the likes of ThumbTack, Rainforest QA, Brightroll, and Groupon. In Today’s Episode You Will Learn:

5 Signs Your Organization is Ready for Sales Enablement Now


This post is by Chanin Ballance from Openview Labs


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The way customers approach new purchases is changing and companies using traditional methods of adding more sales reps or overlay sales to increase sales may no longer be effective or practical. Selling the way your customers want while also scaling the sales organization to drive revenue and growth is challenging. Successful sales leaders are rethinking ways to optimize their current sales force and sales enablement is addressing that challenge. But is implementing a sales enablement function the answer? Clearly it is no longer just for early adopters and enterprise level sales, and it has become much more mainstream. However, there may still be hesitation in your organization about when and if this initiative will really pay off. Investing in sales enablement is usually not a matter of if, but when. Here are five tell-tale signs that your organization is ready to make the investment with sales enablement .

1. The increased
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How would Jason Lemkin implement a Customer Success Management team at a budding startup?


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Ah, who should Customer Success report to. It’s not super simple. There are generally 3 options in the early and middle days:
  • CEO.
  • VP of Sales (once you have one).
  • VP of Something Else. Finance sometimes. Product on occasion. Other “business” co-founder.
There are clear Pros and Cons to reporting to a VP of Sales. The Pros are:
  • Usually, a VP of Sales is your best manager. So usually, she can easily also manage Customer Success as well as all her reps.
  • Better alignment with VPS owning an ARR/MRR goal vs. just bookings goal. She’ll be better able to hit your ARR end-of-year goal if she’s also in charge of churn, and all upsell.
  • She probably knows better how to do this than you do.
But the Cons are also large:

Entrepreneurs have to be able to sell and to recruit. Can a technical cofounder do well with lesser selling skills?


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Of course. If the founder-CEO is great at sales — not just revenue/product sales, but vision sales, stock sales, and recruiting sales as well — then as long as the “technical” cofounder still likes to sell, you are way ahead. If your CTO can meet with a prospect and/or a customer and carry part of the conversation, that is terrific. If your CTO can meet customers at the office and explain why everything will be better, and will be great, that is terrific. A CEO without a CTO to help her sell is at a disadvantage. The CTO doesn’t have to be great at selling. If she just wants to help sell, that’s a win right there. View original question on quora The post Entrepreneurs have to be able to sell and to recruit. Can a technical cofounder do well with lesser selling skills? appeared first on SaaStr.

Do we hire people without remote work experience?


This post is by Groove's Journey to 100k from Groove's Journey to 100k


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Every Friday, we’re answering your questions about business, startups, customer success and more. Happy Friday! This week’s question comes via comment from Josh: I love this question, because it hones in on an undeniable truth: not every good worker is a good remote worker (yet). Successfully working from home is a skill, just like programming, designing or writing. It takes time and commitment to develop that skill, and the traditional office culture doesn’t give us any reason to do that. We had some early hires⁠—very talented people⁠—not work out, only because they had never worked remotely before and we were unsuccessful at helping them develop that skill. So, to answer Josh’s question, yes, we don’t just look for good startup employees, but we look for good startup employees with experience working remotely. Here’s more about how we make remote working work.

Send me weekly updates about Groove’s Friday Q&A

Do we hire people without remote work experience?


This post is by Groove's Journey to 100k from Groove's Journey to 100k


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Every Friday, we’re answering your questions about business, startups, customer success and more. Happy Friday! This week’s question comes via comment from Josh: I love this question, because it hones in on an undeniable truth: not every good worker is a good remote worker (yet). Successfully working from home is a skill, just like programming, designing or writing. It takes time and commitment to develop that skill, and the traditional office culture doesn’t give us any reason to do that. We had some early hires⁠—very talented people⁠—not work out, only because they had never worked remotely before and we were unsuccessful at helping them develop that skill. So, to answer Josh’s question, yes, we don’t just look for good startup employees, but we look for good startup employees with experience working remotely. Here’s more about how we make remote working work.

Send me weekly updates about Groove’s Friday Q&A

The keys to the kingdom: why GrowthX’s Sean Sheppard preaches listening, authenticity and research as the pillars of successful selling


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Current sales culture, for the most part, is entirely concerned with the close. It’s an understandable focal point, of course. Closing a customer means more revenue for the company, and more revenue for the company means growth. Oh, and closing a customer also means a commission cheque to the sales person responsible. And sales people like commission cheques. The post The keys to the kingdom: why GrowthX’s Sean Sheppard preaches listening, authenticity and research as the pillars of successful selling appeared first on Predictable Revenue.

The keys to the kingdom: why GrowthX’s Sean Sheppard preaches listening, authenticity and research as the pillars of successful selling


This post is by Collin Stewart from Predictable Revenue


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Current sales culture, for the most part, is entirely concerned with the close. It’s an understandable focal point, of course. Closing a customer means more revenue for the company, and more revenue for the company means growth. Oh, and closing a customer also means a commission cheque to the sales person responsible. And sales people like commission cheques. The post The keys to the kingdom: why GrowthX’s Sean Sheppard preaches listening, authenticity and research as the pillars of successful selling appeared first on Predictable Revenue.

5 Advantages To Working With a New VC


This post is by Jason Lemkin from SaaStr


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We’re all attracted to brands.  We want Google and Salesforce and Amazon as our customers.  We want to be in the Cloud 100 and on TechCrunch every week.  We want to be on stage at the SaaStr Annual ? Brands do matter.  They are a proxy, albeit an imperfect one, for quality.  They at least help guide us on what vendors and products to pick, especially if we don’t have time to do the diligence ourselves. The same is true in venture capital, when you go to raise money.  There are good reasons to take money from the Top Brands in VC.  Their brand will accrete to your brand.  They likely have better networks.  And maybe even most importantly, later stage VCs all want to write bigger checks into startups funded by the VCs with the best brand at each preceding stage (pre-seed, seed, A, B, C, etc.).   Look Continue reading "5 Advantages To Working With a New VC"

5 Strategies for Hiring a Diverse Team


This post is by Ji-A Min from Openview Labs


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To create an effective team, it’s important to consider the diverse and complementary skill sets of individual team members. But diversity in skills is only one component of building a successful team. What does a diverse team look like and how does diversity contribute to a more effective workplace?

Types of Workplace Diversity

Workplace diversity is defined as understanding, accepting, and valuing differences between people. In general, when we think about workplace diversity we think about inherent diversity – demographic characteristics such as gender, ethnic background, sexual orientation, and age. The other type of workplace diversity is acquired diversity – differences in knowledge, personality, skill sets, and values, which are often uncorrelated with demographics. The idea is that the less monolithic your team is in these categories, the more able you’ll be to foster an environment where different ideas, innovative approaches, and collaboration can grow

Benefits of a Diverse Team

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