Throwing in the Towel on Google’s Go: What Programming Taught Me About Sales


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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I started playing around with Google’s programming language called Go yesterday. There’s a tour of the language found here. Clearly, Go has been designed by a group of incredibly smart people and makes a series of terrific design decisions that enable a tremendous amount of flexibility and performance while reducing the amount of code an engineer has to write. But after spending about 90 minutes running through the tutorial, I decided to throw in the towel.

Throwing in the Towel on Google’s Go: What Programming Taught Me About Sales


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




google go.gif I started playing around with Google’s programming language called Go yesterday. There’s a tour of the language found here. Clearly, Go has been designed by a group of incredibly smart people and makes a series of terrific design decisions that enable a tremendous amount of flexibility and performance while reducing the amount of code an engineer has to write. But after spending about 90 minutes running through the tutorial, I decided to throw in the towel. It’s easy to become accustomed to a particular way of doing things. I’m familiar with the Ruby community, the libraries, the development environment and some the intricacies of the language. So it’s difficult to change all of that in the pursuit of some yet unknown gains. Potential customers perform this calculus when evaluating technologies every day. Do I continue to use the technologies with which I’m most familiar? Or is the benefit of a new Continue reading "Throwing in the Towel on Google’s Go: What Programming Taught Me About Sales"

The Startup Sector That’s Quietly Booming


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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I’m asked with some frequency which startup sectors are booming. Mobile messaging and big data are knee-jerk reactions at this point. But these days I often respond “financial services.” In the last two years, financial services startups have been innovating impressively quickly and challenging some of the fundamental ways in which capital and credit are distributed. I count seven major categories of innovation to date: Math Based Currencies/Payment Networks - Bitcoin might be the most well-known and best publicized math-based currency, but there are a handful of others in the market, like OpenCoin and LiteCoin.

The Startup Sector That’s Quietly Booming


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




bitcoin.jpg I’m asked with some frequency which startup sectors are booming. Mobile messaging and big data are knee-jerk reactions at this point. But these days I often respond “financial services.” In the last two years, financial services startups have been innovating impressively quickly and challenging some of the fundamental ways in which capital and credit are distributed. I count seven major categories of innovation to date:
Math Based Currencies/Payment Networks - Bitcoin might be the most well-known and best publicized math-based currency, but there are a handful of others in the market, like OpenCoin and LiteCoin. Math-based currencies are novel ways of enabling instant settlements, low cost transactions and foreign exchanges. The promise of these startups is to create new payment networks and more efficient ways of transferring value. Consumer Credit - After the crash of 2008, bank lending collapsed. This created the opportunity for new forms of consumer lending Continue reading "The Startup Sector That’s Quietly Booming"

The First Rails App I Built at Google


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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At about 11pm on a Tuesday night in 2006, I began coding a skeleton CRM web app for our internal use at Google called Toothpaste that tracked the key details of our larger inside sales customers. It was my first real Rails project after spending quite some coding Java. After I ran “rails server”, I watched the terminal as the program spit out a few lines from the built in app server, Webbrick, and refreshed my browser to see the Ruby on Rails Welcome page.

The First Rails App I Built at Google


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Welcome aboard.png At about 11pm on a Tuesday night in 2006, I began coding a skeleton CRM web app for our internal use at Google called Toothpaste that tracked the key details of our larger inside sales customers. It was my first real Rails project after spending quite some coding Java. After I ran “rails server”, I watched the terminal as the program spit out a few lines from the built in app server, Webbrick, and refreshed my browser to see the Ruby on Rails Welcome page. Within a few hours, the first version was functionally complete and I went to bed excited by the prospect of demo'ing what I had built.
Having worked with Java and other languages, I was dazzled by the speed of development of Ruby on Rails. It seemed to take only 10% of the time that a Java web app might. In addition, I benefitted enormously from Continue reading "The First Rails App I Built at Google"

How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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When I first started in venture capital five years ago, I wanted to create a programmatic way to analyze companies well. My goal was to be able to step into a meeting with an entrepreneur with some kind of form that I would fill out throughout the meeting, so that by the end of the meeting I might have an understanding how the startup fits into its ecosystem. It took quite a while to devise this framework and to revise it until it became useful, practical and insightful.

How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When I first started in venture capital five years ago, I wanted to create a programmatic way to analyze companies well. My goal was to be able to step into a meeting with an entrepreneur with some kind of form that I would fill out throughout the meeting, so that by the end of the meeting I might have an understanding how the startup fits into its ecosystem. It took quite a while to devise this framework and to revise it until it became useful, practical and insightful. I spoke with friends who were consultants and who analyze companies for a living. I read many books on the topics of competition and strategy. Last, I spoke with other investors. But in the end I chose three simple frameworks that were already well-known and which fit together on two sheets of paper: The Business Model Canvas, Porter’s Five Forces, and Value
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Continue reading "How to Analyze Your Startup Like A VC in 15 Minutes Or Less"

Debunking the Myths of Social, Viral and Community


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What is a social product? This was the question Sandi MacPherson, founder of Quibb posed to me, over lunch earlier this week. In Startupland, we bandy about terms like social, social media, virality and community when talking about products but it wasn’t until that moment that I stopped to think a bit more about what each word really means. Sandi has thought a lot about these concepts while building Quibb and she has some of the clearest points of view on social products I’ve encountered.

Debunking the Myths of Social, Viral and Community


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




social chiclets.jpg What is a social product? This was the question Sandi MacPherson, founder of Quibb posed to me, over lunch earlier this week. In Startupland, we bandy about terms like social, social media, virality and community when talking about products but it wasn’t until that moment that I stopped to think a bit more about what each word really means. Sandi has thought a lot about these concepts while building Quibb and she has some of the clearest points of view on social products I’ve encountered. These are my notes from that conversation:

Social

Social products have three parts: product (the technology), means of user acquisition/growth (virality) and community (people). The first part, the product, has three features: user profiles, a relationship metaphor (follow/friend) and some kind of data stream/feed for content sharing. But just building a product with these three features isn’t anywhere close to enough to be successful. Next, Continue reading "Debunking the Myths of Social, Viral and Community"