The Data Behind Why Google’s Play Is So Much Harder For Startups To Crack Than the iOS App Store


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As the number of Android users continues approach 1B devices, more and more startups are looking to deploy complementary applications on Android, in addition to their iOS applications. Some startups are beginning looking to launch on Android first. But the dynamics of the Android app store are quite different from iOS. In fact, they are much more challenging for startups. Like iOS’s app store, Android’s app store also ranks applications. But the ranking system is very different in four key ways:

The Data Behind Why Google’s Play Is So Much Harder For Startups To Crack Than the iOS App Store


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As the number of Android users continues approach 1B devices, more and more startups are looking to deploy complementary applications on Android, in addition to their iOS applications. Some startups are beginning looking to launch on Android first. But the dynamics of the Android app store are quite different from iOS. In fact, they are much more challenging for startups. Like iOS’s app store, Android’s app store also ranks applications. But the ranking system is very different in four key ways:

TL/DR

  1. Android seems to tune/control the charts to encourage fewer large movements of applications within the rankings than iOS. The rankings aren’t wholly calculated from the previous hour’s downloads like iOS.
  2. As a result, it’s much harder for new entrants to break into the top of the charts on Android than iOS. Existing top applications are much better insulated from competitors than with Apple.
  3. But, the decreased volatility means
    iOSVariance.png
    Android Variance.png
    iOSByRank.png
    AndroidByRank.png
    iOSCompetitiveness.png
    AndroidCompetitiveness.png
    Continue reading "The Data Behind Why Google’s Play Is So Much Harder For Startups To Crack Than the iOS App Store"

Elon Musk’s Genius: Understanding the Cost of a Screw and the Value of a Photo


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Last night, Elon Musk inspired the audience at D. It is hard to overstate the scope and breadth of his ambitions or the impact of his start ups PayPal, Tesla, and SpaceX on payments, automobiles and space. Behind the desire to listen to great men like Musk speak about their perspectives is a hope to receive some insight, some pearl of wisdom. Last night, I came away with two of those both about startups.

Elon Musk’s Genius: Understanding the Cost of a Screw and the Value of a Photo


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Last night, Elon Musk inspired the audience at D. It is hard to overstate the scope and breadth of his ambitions or the impact of his start ups PayPal, Tesla, and SpaceX on payments, automobiles and space. Behind the desire to listen to great men like Musk speak about their perspectives is a hope to receive some insight, some pearl of wisdom. Last night, I came away with two of those both about startups. First, when the inevitable question came along along asking Musk to compare his grand plans with the innovations and ambitions in photo sharing applications, Musk replied in the following way: He said that there are many ways of creating value. Photo sharing apps create a small amount of value for a huge number of people. Aggregating that small value across billions can create big companies. Second, when asked about the origins of SpaceX, his first major Continue reading "Elon Musk’s Genius: Understanding the Cost of a Screw and the Value of a Photo"

Block and Tackle Product Marketing


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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At the D conference yesterday, Tim Cook said many things without saying much. But one story did strike me. Cook described the product management and strategy process at Apple. Walt Mossberg asked Cook why the iPhone has only one flavor when the iPod had so many including the shuffle, the nano, the mini, and the classic. Even though both products originally launched as a single model, the iPod flourished into a family of products while the iPhone has remained a single SKU.

Block and Tackle Product Marketing


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




which_ipod_are_you_chart_620px.png At the D conference yesterday, Tim Cook said many things without saying much. But one story did strike me. Cook described the product management and strategy process at Apple. Walt Mossberg asked Cook why the iPhone has only one flavor when the iPod had so many including the shuffle, the nano, the mini, and the classic. Even though both products originally launched as a single model, the iPod flourished into a family of products while the iPhone has remained a single SKU. Cook responded by telling the story of the shuffle. The original shuffle had no screen, focused primarily on shuffling music and was designed for athletes - a use case that while somewhat well served by the existing iPod, was much better served by a proprietary device. But it was only once the iPod had reached a certain scale of usage that the executive team at Apple could justify Continue reading "Block and Tackle Product Marketing"

Startup Pricing: How to Manage Channel Conflict


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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You have just launched your new software start up. The last webpage to go up on the website is the pricing page. Like many other SaaS startups, you decide to employ some version the three pane pricing plan: first the free version, second a paid upgrade costing between $5-$40 per month, and third an enterprise tier with a “Call for Quote” in place of the price. A few days after you launch, an enterprise customer contacts you asking for a quote.

Startup Pricing: How to Manage Channel Conflict


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




pricingpagesdesign25.jpg You have just launched your new software start up. The last webpage to go up on the website is the pricing page. Like many other SaaS startups, you decide to employ some version the three pane pricing plan: first the free version, second a paid upgrade costing between $5-$40 per month, and third an enterprise tier with a “Call for Quote” in place of the price. A few days after you launch, an enterprise customer contacts you asking for a quote. You respond with an offer that significantly higher per seat than the paid plan. Let’s test the waters, you think. Having seen your pricing page, the enterprise customer asks why the enterprise tier is so much more expensive than the paid tier. After all, the cost to deliver the service for each kind of user, whether individual or enterprise, is the same.

Serving Two Customers at the Same Time

Continue reading "Startup Pricing: How to Manage Channel Conflict"

A Startup’s Guide to Maximizing Last Mover Advantage


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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About a year ago, Peter Thiel spoke at a PandoDaily event where he extolled the last mover advantage: “First mover isn’t what’s important — it’s the last mover. Like Microsoft was the last operating system, and Google was the last search engine.” I hear this refrain more and more in pitches. The thinking goes the last entrant to the market benefit from mistakes made by earlier entrants. But being the last mover isn’t always advantageous.

A Startup’s Guide to Maximizing Last Mover Advantage


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




formula1-gp-live.jpg About a year ago, Peter Thiel spoke at a PandoDaily event where he extolled the last mover advantage:
“First mover isn’t what’s important — it’s the last mover. Like Microsoft was the last operating system, and Google was the last search engine.”
I hear this refrain more and more in pitches. The thinking goes the last entrant to the market benefit from mistakes made by earlier entrants. But being the last mover isn’t always advantageous. The reality is more nuanced.

When Last Mover Works

Technology, platform or behavioral discontinuities. The last mover is the agent of Clayton Christensen’s Innovator’s Dilemma embodied. It’s the company that pursues an incumbent with faster, better or cheaper solution and in particular a solution that cannibalizes the incumbent’s business model typically because of a lower cost structure. While Google did develop a better ranking algo, Google also had a fundamental cost advantage. Google Continue reading "A Startup’s Guide to Maximizing Last Mover Advantage"