What Today’s Revolution in Publishing is Missing


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There’s something beautiful about handwriting that we’ve never been able to capture on the Web. Handwriting has style, a uniqueness to each writer and also an ability to capture the evolution of thought with crossed out words, carats and interjected clauses and margins full of edits. The image above is my favorite from Emily Temple’s curation effort of a series of famous authors' manuscripts on a Tumblog. I was thinking about how much differently this blog feels to a reader than the above draft of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Hound of the Baskervilles.

What Today’s Revolution in Publishing is Missing


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




baskervilles.jpg There’s something beautiful about handwriting that we’ve never been able to capture on the Web. Handwriting has style, a uniqueness to each writer and also an ability to capture the evolution of thought with crossed out words, carats and interjected clauses and margins full of edits. The image above is my favorite from Emily Temple’s curation effort of a series of famous authors' manuscripts on a Tumblog. I was thinking about how much differently this blog feels to a reader than the above draft of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” Doyle’s writing, careful and well-spaced, clean looks like Sherlock Holmes' hand and it gives a feeling of methodological study and thought. And most of all, it is unique to Doyle. Other examples, like Nabokov’s below, confer a very different feeling of chaos and stress and long frenetic nights of writing. Unlike each of these manuscripts,
nabokov.jpg
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The Antidote to Burnout is Progress


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Andrew Dumont wrote about his grueling schedule at a startup and the lessons on “Avoiding Burnout” which spurred a torrent of comments on HackerNews. For me, the most interesting comment is this one by Daniel Ribeiro who quotes Isaac Yonemoto: Burnout is caused when you repeatedly make large amounts of sacrifice and or effort into high-risk problems that fail…You effectively condition your brain to associate work with failure… The best way to prevent burnout is to follow up a serious failure with doing small things that you know are going to work.

The Antidote to Burnout is Progress


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




match.jpg Andrew Dumont wrote about his grueling schedule at a startup and the lessons on “Avoiding Burnout” which spurred a torrent of comments on HackerNews. For me, the most interesting comment is this one by Daniel Ribeiro who quotes Isaac Yonemoto:
Burnout is caused when you repeatedly make large amounts of sacrifice and or effort into high-risk problems that fail…You effectively condition your brain to associate work with failure… The best way to prevent burnout is to follow up a serious failure with doing small things that you know are going to work.
Burnout is a motivation problem, a listlessness, a defeatist attitude, and perhaps even a hopelessness, triggered by the lack of progress. I suspect burnout is much more pronounced for information workers - people who deal in bits each day - because unlike a mason or an architect, the product of much of our work isn’t visible. Even Continue reading "The Antidote to Burnout is Progress"

Building Content Strategy by Segmenting and Analyzing Twitter Followers


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To answer that question, you have to look for examples of the best storytellers. The best storytellers are the television studios. They divide the day into different segments to reach different audiences. Morning: news. Midday: soap operas. Evening: Nightly news segues into primetime sitcom. Late night: news segues into comedy. An entrepreneur told me a few weeks ago, when we where talking about how to build a blog audience and I had asked him how he thought about content strategy.

Building Content Strategy by Segmenting and Analyzing Twitter Followers


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




twitter2010.jpeg
To answer that question, you have to look for examples of the best storytellers. The best storytellers are the television studios. They divide the day into different segments to reach different audiences. Morning: news. Midday: soap operas. Evening: Nightly news segues into primetime sitcom. Late night: news segues into comedy.
An entrepreneur told me a few weeks ago, when we where talking about how to build a blog audience and I had asked him how he thought about content strategy. In short, segmentation was his answer. Figure out all the customer types and give each one what they want. Since that conversation, I’ve thought a lot about what it means for this blog. Should every week contain a post targeted to one particular audience segment? If so, which are the main segments within the audience? How would I even generate such an analysis? In the end, I co-opted an existing tool. Continue reading "Building Content Strategy by Segmenting and Analyzing Twitter Followers"

Design’s New Frontier: The IRL Era


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When the neologism was popularized in 2004 by Tim O'Reilly, the words Web 2.0 captured a desire for the web to become interactive. It was a description of a movement towards social media and engaging users on the web. But more than an idea, it carried a design aesthetic which focused on the user, user experience and engagement. After all, users wouldn’t participate on a hostile site. We’re no longer in the Web 2.

Design’s New Frontier: The IRL Era


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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square-signature-screen.jpg When the neologism was popularized in 2004 by Tim O'Reilly, the words Web 2.0 captured a desire for the web to become interactive. It was a description of a movement towards social media and engaging users on the web. But more than an idea, it carried a design aesthetic which focused on the user, user experience and engagement. After all, users wouldn’t participate on a hostile site. We’re no longer in the Web 2.0 age - look no further than the Google Trends data to prove the point - but the relentless pursuit of the best user experience lives on in a new era, the IRL (in real life) era. ScreenCapture at Fri Apr 26 06:46:40 PDT 2013.png The IRL era is all about mating technology and the real world. IRL means paying for a coffee with a mobile phone that never leaves your pocket (Square), or pressing a button on an app to order a Continue reading "Design’s New Frontier: The IRL Era"

Out of My Depth


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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“What’s the difference between a string and a String?” I asked on the first day of my engineering internship at a startup. That comment drew some sighs from the other engineers in the cube. The pit in my stomach confirmed what I already knew - I was out of my depth. I had never programmed in Java before that day. And there I was, a Java engineering intern at this startup.

Out of My Depth


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




intellij.png “What’s the difference between a string and a String?” I asked on the first day of my engineering internship at a startup. That comment drew some sighs from the other engineers in the cube. The pit in my stomach confirmed what I already knew - I was out of my depth. I had never programmed in Java before that day. And there I was, a Java engineering intern at this startup. Over the next few months, I imbibed as much as I could about object oriented programming and servlets and Struts and Tomcat and Apache and databases as I could. Boy, were those engineers patient with me. They were saints. By the end of the summer, thanks to the countless hours of help and explanation from the team, I was a productive, more confident engineer and helped ship a few (insignificant) features. But I’ll never forget that feeling of Continue reading "Out of My Depth"