Year in review: Best of 2012


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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About three years ago, I started journaling my startup education by blogging. In retrospect, blogging has been one of the most rewarding activities for me as an investor. Blogging helps me some observe changes in the start-up ecosystem, communicate trends primarily through data while strengthening and building relationships. It’s been more gratifying than I could have hoped. Over the past year, quite a bit has happened on this blog. I’ve tried to write a post every working day on both tactical topics for startups like fundraising and management and macro/strategic subjects like the fund raising market and trends in mobile.

Year in review: Best of 2012


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




About three years ago, I started journaling my startup education by blogging. In retrospect, blogging has been one of the most rewarding activities for me as an investor. Blogging helps me some observe changes in the start-up ecosystem, communicate trends primarily through data while strengthening and building relationships. It’s been more gratifying than I could have hoped. Over the past year, quite a bit has happened on this blog. I’ve tried to write a post every working day on both tactical topics for startups like fundraising and management and macro/strategic subjects like the fund raising market and trends in mobile. During that time, a small community has grown around the blog for which I’m very grateful. Traffic on the blog has grown from about 2,000 visitors per month in January to about 30,000 visitors per month in December. I find it hard to believe the growth. It’s all thanks to Continue reading "Year in review: Best of 2012"

Tablets: the third platform


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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It’s easy to call a tablet a larger a mobile phone. Or a replacement for a notebook or ultrabook. But to dismiss tablets as scaled clones of their bigger and smaller brothers is a mistake. Tablets are the third type of device: the one with the most revenue potential for ecommerce and developers alike. Tablets drive greater volumes of traffic, that convert to paid at better rates, and drive better qualified and less expensive leads through advertising.

Tablets: the third platform


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s easy to call a tablet a larger a mobile phone. Or a replacement for a notebook or ultrabook. But to dismiss tablets as scaled clones of their bigger and smaller brothers is a mistake. Tablets are the third type of device: the one with the most revenue potential for ecommerce and developers alike. Tablets drive greater volumes of traffic, that convert to paid at better rates, and drive better qualified and less expensive leads through advertising. Despite the fact that tablet penetration is less than half of smart phone penetration in the US, tablets' share of traffic to websites outpaced mobile web in Q1 2012. And with tablet penetration doubling year over year, that trend is certain to continue. Screen Shot 2012-12-18 at 6.31.30 PM.png More impressively, overall tablet users' conversion rates are twice as strong as mobile phones and 20% better than PCs. And because the ecosystem is young, tablet ads' costs-per-click are
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Continue reading "Tablets: the third platform"

The myth of the generalist


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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When I started working at Google, I heard the word generalist over and over. “We only hire generalists,” I was told. Eight years later this mantra is pretty common. I hear it often both referring to the desired characteristics of new hires and also the aspirations of a team - “we want to be a team of generalists”. At the time, I understood the word generalist to mean someone really good at a lot of things.

The myth of the generalist


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When I started working at Google, I heard the word generalist over and over. “We only hire generalists,” I was told. Eight years later this mantra is pretty common. I hear it often both referring to the desired characteristics of new hires and also the aspirations of a team - “we want to be a team of generalists”. At the time, I understood the word generalist to mean someone really good at a lot of things. In computer science, it might mean an engineer who is great at Javascript, CSS, HTML, Java, Rails, MapReduce, NodeJS - familiar with every technology up and down the stack. But these engineers are unicorns - they’re mythical. SAN.jpeg Even if I were to find one, how could an interview possibly screen for such depth of knowledge? And is a walking technical encyclopedia really the right fit for a startup? Reading through Drucker’s Effective Executive, I Continue reading "The myth of the generalist"

Changes in the rules of the [startup] game


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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The famous global macro hedge fund manager George Soros once said, “I don’t play the game by a particular set of rules; I look for changes in the rules of the game.” Inside the House of Money Soros' insight is equally well applied to startups. Successful startups discover and leverage changes in the rules of the game. Discovering the changes in the rules of the game is one of the hardest things about starting a company, but understanding precisely the change and developing a hypothesis for exploiting the change is essential.

Changes in the rules of the [startup] game


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The famous global macro hedge fund manager George Soros once said,
“I don’t play the game by a particular set of rules; I look for changes in the rules of the game.”
Inside the House of Money
Soros' insight is equally well applied to startups. Successful startups discover and leverage changes in the rules of the game. Discovering the changes in the rules of the game is one of the hardest things about starting a company, but understanding precisely the change and developing a hypothesis for exploiting the change is essential. Typically, there are three types of changes in the rules of the game that startups pursue: technology discontinuities, ecosystem discontinuities, and behavioral discontinuities. Technology discontinuities, those changes in the rules that occur as a result of new technology are often the most apparent. Clay Christensen’s smaller hard drives is the classic example. More recently big data technologies
monopolyrules-1.jpeg
Continue reading "Changes in the rules of the [startup] game"