Links for 2012-06-29 [del.icio.us]


This post is by SaaS Growth Strategies from SaaS Growth Strategies


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Facebook’s new feature: your top 7 friends


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Facebook is asking me to redefine my closest 7 friends. I logged into Facebook today to see this new feature, starring your friends. Below this text is a Google circles like UI that asks me to star friends whose updates are particularly important to me. With hundreds of friends, the average Facebook user logs in to see wall of updates that aren’t quite relevant. Some of us have reduced our friend graphs and unfriended contacts in order to return the feed to relevance, which isn’t a desired user behavior.

Facebook’s new feature: your top 7 friends


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Facebook is asking me to redefine my closest 7 friends. I logged into Facebook today to see this new feature, starring your friends. Below this text is a Google circles like UI that asks me to star friends whose updates are particularly important to me. With hundreds of friends, the average Facebook user logs in to see wall of updates that aren’t quite relevant. Some of us have reduced our friend graphs and unfriended contacts in order to return the feed to relevance, which isn’t a desired user behavior. Facebook, after all, wants to encourage expansive graphs. The challenge that feeds everywhere face is the local minimum problem. Machine learning algorithms like EdgeRank can easily fall into local minimums, where the same people appear on the feed because they’ve been appearing on the feed. The people in the feed become stale and either the model has to be rebuilt or Continue reading "Facebook’s new feature: your top 7 friends"

Why did Apple’s unwillingness to compromise finally succeed?


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple has built the most successful tech ecosystem of the past ten years. And they have done it, surprisingly, by dictating the rules of that ecosystem. Compare iOS and Android. To win, both needed to develop initially 2 but eventually 3 things: A mobile OS Mobile hardware to run the OS And later, the content ecosystem Apple controls nearly every aspect of this stack, from the prices of books and movies, to the place where apps are downloaded, to the payment mechanisms, down to the advertising and user tracking.

Why did Apple’s unwillingness to compromise finally succeed?


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple has built the most successful tech ecosystem of the past ten years. And they have done it, surprisingly, by dictating the rules of that ecosystem. Compare iOS and Android. To win, both needed to develop initially 2 but eventually 3 things:
  1. A mobile OS
  2. Mobile hardware to run the OS
  3. And later, the content ecosystem
Apple controls nearly every aspect of this stack, from the prices of books and movies, to the place where apps are downloaded, to the payment mechanisms, down to the advertising and user tracking. Incredibly, this worked. The movie studios agreed. Book publishers agreed. App developers agreed. Users agreed (and supplied 400M credit cards). By total ecosystem revenue, Apple has built an ecosystem 6.5 times larger than Android: Apple has paid $5B to developers and Google less than $750M. Each ecosystem and its history are very different. Apple’s early ecosystem commanded a very small Continue reading "Why did Apple’s unwillingness to compromise finally succeed?"

Stories, not sentences


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Although today’s society is said to be in a state of information overload, in fact it may not be in excess. It’s just an overflow of odd and fragmented information in the media. The amount of information in each fragment is in fact quite small. In this slew of half baked information, isn’t the brain oppressed? The stress on the brain isn’t because of quantity, but because of limited quality. Kenya Hara, Designing Design

Stories, not sentences


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Although today’s society is said to be in a state of information overload, in fact it may not be in excess. It’s just an overflow of odd and fragmented information in the media. The amount of information in each fragment is in fact quite small. In this slew of half baked information, isn’t the brain oppressed? The stress on the brain isn’t because of quantity, but because of limited quality.

Kenya Hara, Designing Design

Design is philosophy for the modern age. I can think of no more relevant example than this one from Hara’s book. We’re in a messy milieu: a morass of links, images and text without sense or order or thought. It’s time for us to rethink the way we consume information now that we’re swimming in it. First there were RSS feeds (Google Reader). Who didn’t open it up to 1000+ articles to read with half of Continue reading "Stories, not sentences"