Coming Very Soon: The New 2.0 SaaStr CoSelling Space in SOMA: Bigger, Better, More-er

We’ve moving! We are taking the learnings from the past 15 months in the first SaaStr CoSelling Space in Potrero Hill / Design District and taking them to an even bigger, better, nicer space right in SOMA, in the heart of everything! We’ll have a huge, 18,000+ sq ft space right at 303 Second Street. We’ll have our first kick-off party and event there too in a little while, with Mamoon Hamid of Kleiner Perkins, investor in Slack, Box, Yammer, Intercom, and so many other SaaS leaders.  This will be a fun one. We’ll also have an informal open house right after March 1. The CSS 2.0 will be almost full when we move in (almost everyone is moving over), but since the space is 40% bigger (18,000 square feet), we’ll have room for a handful of full and part-time post-revenue SaaS startups in the space.

Apply here
Continue reading "Coming Very Soon: The New 2.0 SaaStr CoSelling Space in SOMA: Bigger, Better, More-er"

SaaStr Podcast #162: Olof Mathé, Founder & CEO @ Mixmax Shares How To Achieve True Virality in SaaS with $0 CAC

Welcome to Episode 162! Olof Mathé is the Founder & CEO @ Mixmax, the startup that allows you to be a sales pro, providing powerful analytics, automation and enhancements for your outbound communication and a product that has achieved almost the impossible in SaaS, true viral growth and a $0 CAC. As for Olof, prior to Mixmax he led the team that built Inkling Habitat, now adopted by the world’s largest publishers and before that he was an entrepreneur and worked at Skype and McKinsey. In Today’s Episode You Will Learn:

The Startup Playbook: The Product is Just Part of What You’re Selling

Editor’s Note: The following is an excerpt from The Startup Playbook: Founder-to-Founder Advice From Two Startup Veterans available on Amazon here. startup playbookIn the first part of our book, The Startup Playbook: Founder-to-Founder Advice from Two Startup Veterans, we broke down what it takes to be a founder so that you can do a gut check on whether it’s the right path for you. In the second part, we showed you how to develop a concept for a product and how to lay the right foundation to build a successful, fundable company. In the third section, we outlined how to get funding for your new company. Here, in the fourth and final section, we’ll discuss how you bring your concept to life and get your product into the hands of the people who want it the most. If you’ve gotten this far, you’re likely looking past your first round of
Continue reading "The Startup Playbook: The Product is Just Part of What You’re Selling"

What are some of the “ultimate sins” when it comes to marketing and/or sales in early stage companies?

My list of some bad ones: Sales:
  • Hiring any reps you wouldn’t buy from. This never works out in the early days. Later, once you have a strong VP of Sales, it’s fine though.
  • Hiring a “VP” of Sales before you have 2 scaled reps and a repeating process. Never works out.
  • Crazy quotas. You can’t set folks up to fail 100% for sure. Especially the first few months, maybe even make their quota simply equal to their salary. Your sales reps need to eat.
  • Expecting a closer / in-bound rep to do out-bound. They can’t. You have to hand in-bound folks leads. They are no good at generating them.
  • Expecting an SDR to close. Hire stretch reps if you want, but someone without any closing experience likely can’t close at your startup no one has ever heard of. Unless the product is very cheap and the prospect is close Continue reading "What are some of the “ultimate sins” when it comes to marketing and/or sales in early stage companies?"

What should be the priorities of SaaS founders during the early stages?

Some ideas:
  1. Find a truly great co-founder. Slow down. There is too much to do in SaaS — sales, customer success, product, engineering, demand gen, etc. If you don’t have a great co-founder, slow down and find one.
  2. Get those First 10 Customers — However and Whenever. We all get the first customers differently, based on who we are and what our app does. Outbound? Events? PR? Content Marketing? Try it all — and lean in on what you are good at. Don’t worry if you aren’t sure where the Next 10 will come from. Just get the First 10 however, whenever, wherever.
  3. Understand the Market Better. Most founders don’t understand their markets well enough in the beginning. They don’t do enough interviews, meet enough potential customers, do enough work, etc. They shoot from the hip too much, and assume too much from their own experiences and what they read Continue reading "What should be the priorities of SaaS founders during the early stages?"

How does Jason M. Lemkin balance empathically helping SaaS founders/the larger SaaS community while also protecting his limited time?

It’s really tough now. The biggest challenge has been the overall growth of SaaStr “Inc” (media-events-etc) from $0m to $10m in 18 months. While a great way to refresh learnings and do great things, it’s been a lot of change and presenting huge operational challenges. Add a 17,000 sq ft. CoSelling Space to the mix, plus a $90m set of funds, and it’s a lot going on. The hope is to do more things that are scaleable (SaaStr Annual + events, SaaStr Pro – check it out!, content like Quora, SaaStr podcast, etc.). Coffee meetings and 1–on-1s are tough. The best way to do those is to work out of the SaaStr CoSellingSpace.com View original question on quora The post How does Jason M. Lemkin balance empathically helping SaaS founders/the larger SaaS community while also protecting his limited time? appeared first on SaaStr.

If you were to start a SaaS company right now, would you focus on an niched product with quick adoption, or a complex product with fewer, larger customers?

Do what you know how to do. Perhaps the #1 mistake I see in seasoned executives in SaaS that start companies is Grass is Greener Syndrome. I see in particular seasoned Oracle execs wanting to do freemium because it’s so much “easier” and “the sales cycles are so much shorter”. They don’t see the high churn and the total mismatch for their skill sets. We all get to the first $1m in ARR differently. The fastest, best way to get there is to do what you know. Enterprise folks doing enterprise. SMB folks doing SMB. Etc. You don’t have to. But if you don’t, you’ll setting aside domain expertise and possibly a superpower. That’s a few strikes against you that you don’t need to have. View original question on quora The post If you were to start a SaaS company right now, would you focus on an niched product with Continue reading "If you were to start a SaaS company right now, would you focus on an niched product with quick adoption, or a complex product with fewer, larger customers?"