The challenges facing startups serving K-12 education


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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Ariel Diaz wrote an insightful post in PandoDaily yesterday outlining the state of affairs in online education. Ariel touched on the history of education, catalogued the problems of the status quo and pointed to a few innovative initiatives. Most Edu Innovation is Post-Secondary Reading the post and reflecting on the startups I’ve seen, I concluded most of the innovation in education has occurred in post-secondary education instead of K-12, despite the fact that the K-12 market is about 50% larger in dollar terms than the post-secondary market.

The challenges facing startups serving K-12 education


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Ariel Diaz wrote an insightful post in PandoDaily yesterday outlining the state of affairs in online education. Ariel touched on the history of education, catalogued the problems of the status quo and pointed to a few innovative initiatives.

Most Edu Innovation is Post-Secondary

Reading the post and reflecting on the startups I’ve seen, I concluded most of the innovation in education has occurred in post-secondary education instead of K-12, despite the fact that the K-12 market is about 50% larger in dollar terms than the post-secondary market. For example, massively open online courses (MOOCs) like EdX and CourseEra target university students. The major for-profit education companies, Capella and Phoenix, serve university students. 2Tor/2U brings online education to offline colleges. And so on. But the same innovations aren’t present in K-12.

The Two Limiting Factors for the K-12 Market

Why is this? I think there are two limiting factors for serving
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Systems thinking for startups


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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Peter Senge has been called the most influential business strategists of the century and in my view Senge is the successor of Peter Drucker, the management visionary. Senge published a book in 1990 called The Fifth Discipline which I think every manager, founder and CEO should read. Great companies transcend their great products. Not defined by one product, these companies adapt, innovate and reinvent. They learn continuously to succeed as their environment changes.

Systems thinking for startups


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Peter Senge has been called the most influential business strategists of the century and in my view Senge is the successor of Peter Drucker, the management visionary. Senge published a book in 1990 called The Fifth Discipline which I think every manager, founder and CEO should read. Great companies transcend their great products. Not defined by one product, these companies adapt, innovate and reinvent. They learn continuously to succeed as their environment changes. Senge’s book teases apart the five essential components to building a learning organization. At the time the book was published, the first four principles had been well covered: team learning, shared vision, mental models, and personal skills mastery. But the fifth one, the one the book is named after, was Senge’s stroke of genius. The fifth discipline is systems thinking. Systems thinking sounds like an esoteric concept but it’s not. Systems thinking means understanding actions/reactions and feedback
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The future of search


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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The Verge profiled Google Now, Google’s newest search technology which uses “predictive” queries to show users the information they want to see, before users ask. In a single app, the company has combined its latest technologies: voice search that understands speech like a human brain, knowledge of real-world entities, a (somewhat creepy) understanding of who and where you are, and most of all its expertise at ranking information. Google has taken all of that and turned it into an interesting and sometimes useful feature, but if you look closely you can see that it’s more than just a feature, it’s a beta test for the future.

The future of search


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Verge profiled Google Now, Google’s newest search technology which uses “predictive” queries to show users the information they want to see, before users ask.
In a single app, the company has combined its latest technologies: voice search that understands speech like a human brain, knowledge of real-world entities, a (somewhat creepy) understanding of who and where you are, and most of all its expertise at ranking information. Google has taken all of that and turned it into an interesting and sometimes useful feature, but if you look closely you can see that it’s more than just a feature, it’s a beta test for the future.
It’s quite a bold statement to make, but I think it’s accurate. I believe Google Now will become the most salient differentiator of Android devices compared to other operating systems in the next 24 months. The product leverages Google’s investments in machine learning across Continue reading "The future of search"

What to look for when hiring a data scientist


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


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Over the last six months, I’ve been delving deeply into R, linear regressions and machine learning. Part of the rationale has been to remember some of the concepts I learned in grad school studying signal processing. But a more important driver has been the need to better understand how to qualify, evaluate and hire data scientists because data science is a massive competitive advantage. And many of the companies I work with are hiring data scientists.

What to look for when hiring a data scientist


This post is by Tomasz Tunguz from Tomasz Tunguz


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Over the last six months, I’ve been delving deeply into R, linear regressions and machine learning. Part of the rationale has been to remember some of the concepts I learned in grad school studying signal processing. But a more important driver has been the need to better understand how to qualify, evaluate and hire data scientists because data science is a massive competitive advantage. And many of the companies I work with are hiring data scientists.
Support Vector Machine Visualized
Finding the right person to model your data and generate insights can provide massive leverage for your company. But understanding what to look for in a candidate is a challenge. In my view, when hiring a data scientist, one should look for three main skills with a bonus fourth: data processing, data analysis, data modeling, and system architecture.

Data processing

Perhaps the most undervalued skill, data processing is the ability
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