>New York< SaaStr Speaker Series and Meetup THIS TUESDAY!

In case you missed the 500 tweets or the notice in the SaaStr newsletters, we’re doing the first New York Speaker Series this Tuesday:
  • with Matt Staz, CEO of Namely (and one of the highest rated SaaStr Annual 2017 speakers) and
  • David Skok of Matrix Partners (also one of the highest rated SaaStr Annual 2017 speakers) — see his preso below,
  • hosted by Michael Cardamone of SaaStr Fund
  • with a Special Guest Appearance by Jason Lemkin
  • at Work Bench!
Phew! We actually had an amazing SaaStr Meet-up at Work Bench back in 2014 with the founders of pre-nicorn Greenhouse, as well as a classic presentation on Hiring a Great VP of Sales — so it’s a returning home of sorts.  It’s been too long. I will be there early and late, so it’s also a full SaaStr meet-up. Come if you are in New York, and come early! Grab a dirt
Continue reading ">New York< SaaStr Speaker Series and Meetup THIS TUESDAY!"

The 5 Fatal Flaws of most Customer Journey Maps

Customer Journey maps are a favorite tool of Customer Experience (CX) and Customer Success Management (CSM) professionals around the world. Very often, they are elaborate, colorful maps – some look like movie storyboards or even children’s board games – that take the customer on a journey to nowhere. Very often, they are elaborate, colorful maps – some look like movie storyboards or even children’s board games – that take the customer on a journey to nowhere. What journey are you mapping? If it’s not the one that takes your customer to their Required Outcome in an Appropriate Way (together, those two things make up the customer’s Desired Outcome), then it’s a map to nowhere for the customer… and to churn for you. Honestly, from a true Customer Success Management standpoint, we shouldn’t even be talking about maps at all. Instead, we should be talking about something more like a
Continue reading "The 5 Fatal Flaws of most Customer Journey Maps"

How Get Better at Recruiting. (We All Need To).

Recruiting is tough. I certainly don’t do it well enough. But to be a great CEO, you need to find a way to force yourself to be a great recruiter.

Let me share some learnings, and what I do now to force myself to be a better recruiter.  And what I wish I’d done better as a SaaS CEO:

  • Force yourself to interview 30 candidates for each VP position. Great things will happen if you do. First, you will budget a ton of time for recruiting. You’ll have to, to get through 30 interviews. Second, you’ll force yourself to spend more time tracking and managing candidates. And third, you’ll be less likely to settle. You can stop if the Perfect VP turns out to be Candidate 12. But plan on 30.  Find a way.
  • Hire external recruiters — and be very good to them. External recruiters are juggling multiple clients and
    Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 1.53.29 PM
    Continue reading "How Get Better at Recruiting. (We All Need To)."

B2C Lessons for Software Marketers: It’s All About Keeping the Customer Front and Center

The consumerization of tech has transformed more than just how people buy and interact with technology. It’s caused many B2C marketers to migrate to B2B and back again. Throughout my own career, I’ve worked across B2C and B2B companies of all sizes from CPG giants like Kimberly Clark and Kraft to Wayfair.com and now OpenView, where I consult exclusively with B2B software companies. In fact, at Wayfair, a well-established consumer company, I was charged with helping to build their B2B program. A key driver of Wayfair’s rapid B2B expansion, 20 to 500 sales reps in 3 years, was leveraging the organization’s best-in-class B2C marketing strategies. My experiences on both sides of the marketing spectrum are becoming all the more common. Andy Freedman, a self-described recovering corporate brand marketer, has spent more than a decade working with some of the best-known consumer brands including Dunkin’ Donuts, General Mills and
Continue reading "B2C Lessons for Software Marketers: It’s All About Keeping the Customer Front and Center"

B2C Lessons for Software Marketers: It’s All About Keeping the Customer Front and Center

The consumerization of tech has transformed more than just how people buy and interact with technology. It’s caused many B2C marketers to migrate to B2B and back again. Throughout my own career, I’ve worked across B2C and B2B companies of all sizes from CPG giants like Kimberly Clark and Kraft to Wayfair.com and now OpenView, where I consult exclusively with B2B software companies. In fact, at Wayfair, a well-established consumer company, I was charged with helping to build their B2B program. A key driver of Wayfair’s rapid B2B expansion, 20 to 500 sales reps in 3 years, was leveraging the organization’s best-in-class B2C marketing strategies. My experiences on both sides of the marketing spectrum are becoming all the more common. Andy Freedman, a self-described recovering corporate brand marketer, has spent more than a decade working with some of the best-known consumer brands including Dunkin’ Donuts, General Mills and
Continue reading "B2C Lessons for Software Marketers: It’s All About Keeping the Customer Front and Center"

What are some of the best hacks to make recruiting easier?

Recruiting is tough. I certainly don’t do it well enough. But to be a great CEO, you need to find a way to force yourself to be a great recruiter.

Let me share some learnings, and what I do now to force myself to be a better recruiter:

  • Force yourself to interview 30 candidates for each VP position. Great things will happen if you do. First, you will budget a ton of time for recruiting. You’ll have to, to get through 30 interviews. Second, you’ll force yourself to spend more time tracking and managing candidates. And third, you’ll be less likely to settle. You can stop if the Perfect VP is Candidate 12. But plan on 30.
  • Hire external recruiters — and be very good to them. External recruiters are juggling multiple clients and multiple sources. And contingent recruiters only get paid if they place a client. So be cool Continue reading "What are some of the best hacks to make recruiting easier?"

Should Google acquire Slack?

I think it’s worth them trying.

  • Google is making a huge push all across business solutions now, a big one finally.
  • Google has $100b+ on its balance sheet.
  • Google is so big almost nothing can be material.

Even at $200m+ in ARR, Slack wouldn’t be remotely material to Google’s/Alphabet’s business. But it’s probably the best app out there with (x) true scale (>$200m ARR) that (y) is state-of-art (not a 10 year old dated product) with (z) an important position in the market. Importantly, it’s also likely a good cultural fit.

Google has the cash and keeps generating billions more every quarter. This cash isn’t doing them any good just sitting in the bank.

View original question on quora